Information material from Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation

Strategy for sustainable tourism and a growing tourism industry

Published

In this strategy, the Government identifies a number of strategic areas. These are: better regulation, jobs and skills, knowledge and innovation, accessibility and marketing. Each area is viewed from four horizontal perspectives: sustainability, digitisation, place-based development and collaboration.

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The need to continue to develop long-term, sustainable tourism and a competitive, sustainable and innovative tourism industry Sweden-wide has become very clear in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic has shown how all the sectors of the tourism industry are interlinked and interdependent. Developing shared knowledge about the circumstances in which tourism operates and the need to adapt to a changing world can help to foster social, economic and environmental sustainability. Tourism must help to reduce climate impact and must be a burden on the natural world or the environment. Fossil-free transport and circular business models need to be developed along every link in the tourism chain.

The negative impact of the pandemic on the tourism industry has weakened the finances of companies and their ability to employ staff. Working together to develop every aspect of the tourism industry can help to boost economic and social sustainability. The strategy indicates the long-term direction and is a platform for designing tourism policy to 2030.

The need for a strategy

In this strategy, the Government identifies a number of strategic areas. These are: better regulation, jobs and skills, knowledge and innovation, accessibility and marketing. Each area is viewed from four horizontal perspectives: sustainability, digitisation, place-based development and collaboration.

In section 3 onwards, the Government assesses the horizontal perspectives and the strategic areas that in turn lead to a number of long-term focal areas, shown as bulleted lists under the heading Signs of progress. These lists indicate the desired situation for the Swedish tourism industry in ten years’ time.

The strategy as a whole ties in with the 2030 Agenda and the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the Government’s gender equality objective, the climate policy objectives and other objectives set by the Riksdag. The Government intends to draw up action plans in line with the strategy.

The public, private and non-profit sectors have different responsibilities and duties, but the combined outcome in the form of a sustainable and competitive tourism industry will depend on a common understanding of the key issues and coordinating efforts between different policy areas. This strategy sees the Government setting out the desired situation for the Swedish tourism industry in ten years’ time. This can help to establish a coordinated approach, facilitating sustainable development throughout the tourism industry’s system of actors.

This strategy can provide support that other actors at different levels – private, non-profit and public – can draw on in local and regional strategies and action plans. The strategy can therefore contribute to effective use of public funding and resources and to improving synergies between sectors.