This content was published in the period between 3 October 2014 and 20 January 2019

Ministers on this page who have left the Government

Between 21 January 2019 and 5 February 2021 she was Minister for Environment and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister.

Between 25 May 2016 and 21 January 2019 she was Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister.

Between 3 October 2014 and 25 May 2016 she was Minister for International Development Cooperation.

Ministers on this page who have left the Government

Between 21 January 2019 and 5 February 2021 she was Minister for Environment and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister.

Between 25 May 2016 and 21 January 2019 she was Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister.

Between 3 October 2014 and 25 May 2016 she was Minister for International Development Cooperation.

Press release from Ministry for Foreign Affairs

New aid initiative focusing on displaced children

Published

Humanitarian needs in the world are huge. In the autumn amending budget for 2016, which is based on an agreement with the Left Party, the Government proposes that SEK 6.4 billion be fed back to development assistance. SEK 2.5 billion of this will go to new initiatives focusing on displaced children, and SEK 3.9 billion will restore initiatives previously subject to cuts.

In the spring amending budget for 2016, the Government proposed a reduction of SEK 4.1 billion in the development assistance appropriation due to the increased costs of asylum reception. The forecast for the number of asylum seekers has since decreased, which means that funds can be restored to the development assistance appropriation.

Today, 65 million people around the world have fled their homes, and 130 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. There is little indication that the humanitarian situation will improve. Half of displaced people are children. Children are particularly vulnerable in refugee situations. UNICEF estimates that 15 million children in Nigeria, South Sudan, Yemen, Syria, Iraq, Jordan and Malawi need immediate support. At the same time, like many other parts of the humanitarian system, UNICEF is suffering from a serious lack of funds for its humanitarian operations.

"The world needs countries that demonstrate leadership in acute humanitarian situations. I am proud that Sweden is now shifting up another gear to help children fleeing from war, conflict and disasters," says Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate Isabella Lövin.

A large proportion of the extra funds set aside in the autumn amending budget for 2016 will be allocated to core support to humanitarian organisations' budgets. Core support enables these organisations to react quickly and flexibly to sudden crises and deteriorations in existing situations without having to wait for donors to approve targeted funds.

While the acute need for life-sustaining measures such as deliveries of food and medical supplies has sky-rocketed, there is also a growing need for more long-term measures. For this reason, measures are also needed to help displaced people to find work and ways to support themselves, even in difficult environments. It is also important that children have the opportunity to go to school. More than three million children in Syria have been forced to stop attending school as a result of the war, for example.

"It is not enough to provide food, blankets and medicines, there must also be more long-term measures to build faith in the future among people who are stuck in refugee camps. And we must strengthen work on peacebuilding and statebuilding, democracy and human rights, to prevent conflicts breaking out in the first place," says Ms Lövin.

The Government will also raise its level of ambition with respect to achieving the Global Goal target of improved access to sanitation for 60 million people by 2030. Access to water and sanitation generates many positive effects for the economy, people's health and gender equality.

The SEK 6.4 billion will be allocated as follows:

  • Humanitarian aid focusing on children: SEK 1.6 billion (SEK 500 million to UNICEF, a total of SEK 600 million to the UNHCR, CERF, the WFP, etc., and SEK 500 million to the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency's humanitarian funding)
  • Fragile states (including Iraq) and long-term efforts: SEK 500 million
  • Gender equality, SRHR, environment/climate and civil society organisations: SEK 400 million
  • Restoration of previous cuts and appropriation credits: SEK 3.9 billion

Press contact

Hanne Simonsen
Press Secretary to Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister Isabella Lövin
Phone (switchboard) +46 8 405 10 00

Ministers on this page who have left the Government

Between 21 January 2019 and 5 February 2021 she was Minister for Environment and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister.

Between 25 May 2016 and 21 January 2019 she was Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister.

Between 3 October 2014 and 25 May 2016 she was Minister for International Development Cooperation.

Ministers on this page who have left the Government

Between 21 January 2019 and 5 February 2021 she was Minister for Environment and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister.

Between 25 May 2016 and 21 January 2019 she was Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister.

Between 3 October 2014 and 25 May 2016 she was Minister for International Development Cooperation.