Ahead of UN Climate Change Conference COP26: Government intends to double climate aid by 2025

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The world is in an acute climate crisis. The world’s poorest are the least to blame but are the hardest hit. The richer countries have a special responsibility to contribute to the developing countries’ climate transition. The Government therefore intends to double Swedish climate aid to SEK 15 billion by 2025.

In less than three weeks, negotiations will begin at the UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow. The Conference is taking place at a critical time in world history. We are in the midst of a climate crisis, where catastrophes such as protracted droughts, violent fires and devastating floods are becoming more common. The world’s poorest are the least to blame for climate change, but they are hit the hardest by its consequences. All countries must reduce their climate impact to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement, but the richer countries have a special responsibility to take the lead and contribute to the developing countries’ climate transition. Sweden continues to take responsibility and the Government intends to double Swedish climate aid to SEK 15 billion by 2025.

“With today’s decision on doubled climate aid, Sweden not only contributes to greater opportunities for the world’s developing countries to implement the green transition, but it also sends an important message ahead of the climate negotiations in Glasgow. The developed countries must live up to their commitments if we are to have a chance to jointly limit global emissions at the necessary pace,” says Prime Minister Stefan Löfven. 

The trend can be reversed, but not if we wait to take action. That is why the world must now join together to raise climate ambitions.

“By doubling its climate aid, Sweden is showing even stronger leadership on climate change. We make it possible for poor countries to reduce their emissions and make necessary climate adjustments. A doubling of Sweden’s climate aid puts pressure on other countries to contribute more. It increases the chance of achieving a breakthrough in the climate negotiations in Glasgow and thus a faster climate transition worldwide,” says Per Bolund, Minister for Environment and Climate and Deputy Prime Minister.

Swedish climate aid contributes to important investments in both reduced emissions and more climate-friendly and resilient societies in poorer parts of the world. Sweden’s increased climate aid also increases pressure on other rich countries to help fulfil the promise from 2009 of USD 100 billion per year in climate finance. More countries increasing their climate aid would improve the chances of achieving real results in the climate negotiations in Glasgow and thus increasing the pace of global climate transition.

The Government is now making a broad international effort to mobilise additional capital for climate finance and to encourage countries to adopt ambitious climate plans to reduce emissions.

“The world is in a climate crisis with major consequences for human life, health and security. Climate change affects us all, but hits those who are already vulnerable the hardest. Thanks to the Government standing by the 1 per cent goal, we can keep raising ambitions and increasing support to poor countries for climate transition and expansion of renewable energy. Sweden will be part of the solution for the world to meet the 1.5 degree Celsius goal,” says Per Olsson Fridh, Minister for International Development Cooperation.

Press contact

Josefin Sasse
Press Secretary to the Minister for Environment and Climate, and Deputy Prime Minister Per Bolund
Phone (switchboard) +46 8 405 10 00
Mobile +46 730 77 94 69
email to Josefin Sasse
Robert Englund
Press Secretary to the Minister for International Development Cooperation Per Olsson Fridh
Phone (switchboard) +46 8 405 10 00
Mobile +4673-044 89 65
email to Robert Englund